August Books

Here’s what I read over my vacation. It would have been twelve books, but I’m still reading The Orange Eats Creeps, but it’s okay since that book’s like prose no-wave. I sometimes kick myself for not putting up more content here, but other than a weekly writing status report, which I suspect no one wants to read, I can’t think of anything to write for regular content. So monthly book reports it is.

The Drowning Girl – Caitlin R. Kiernan (2012): An impressionistic ghost story that might not be a ghost story, but more along the lines of a Blackwood story where someone encounters something and the something is unfathomable. Here we have a schizophrenic young woman encountering the unknown in the person of another woman, who may be a ghost, or a mermaid, or a wolf dressed in the skin of a girl. Atmospheric and weird in the best way.

Smonk – Tom Franklin (2006): Violent over the top Southern-fried Western populated by mutant cartoon characters armed with guns and high explosives. If you like your violence tobacco-splattered and foul-mouthed, you’ll probably like this.

The Dinner – Herman Koch (2013): Two brothers and their wives get together for dinner and attempt to come to terms with the fact that their sons committed a horrible crime that’s been caught on camera and broadcast around the nation. As the man-hunt remains ongoing each family prepares to do all it can to protect itself, including murder. A somewhat enjoyable book with an unreliable narrator, but I couldn’t help but feel that Koch required pages to tell you what Simenon would only have needed a paragraph and a few ellipses to do.

Missing out: In Praise of the Unlived Life – Adam Phillips (2012): One problem I have with nonfiction is that too often it reads like it would have made for a better article than a book, and that’s the case here. Some nice nuggets buried throughout such as: “We know more about the experiences we haven’t had than about the experiences we have had.” And Phillips then goes on to critique this omniscience and poke holes in it, but often I found the conclusions drowned beneath the erudition.

Killing Rage: Ending Racism – bell hooks (1995): Essays and analysis on racism in America. A counter-point to the Terkel book I read last month. I started it right after that book, but its density slowed me down and I ended up reading it a bit at a time week by week. I’ve recommended it to friends since then. Most people should read this.

Junky – William S. Burroughs (1953): I forgot how great this book was. Yeah. Burroughs was a criminal psychopath. There’s no denying that. But when writing white-hot, as he is here, his prose throws sparks off the page.

Resume with Monsters – William Browning Spencer (1995): Protag works a series of dead-end jobs while trying to get back together with the woman who left him (for good reason) and battle Cthulhu and assorted other Old Ones hiding out behind the facade of corporate America. If you’ve ever worked a shit job and had to suffer through horrible HR presentations than you’ll be simpatico to this book.

The End of Everything – Megan Abbott (2011): This was an amazing book, part detective, part coming of age novel, all riveting, creepy, and startling. A girl’s best friend is kidnapped the summer before they’re both set to begin high school, and sets in motion events that can only lead to an end of innocence and childhood. The brilliant thing in this book is the way the jaded PI trope gets upended by a girl playing detective who’s a complete innocent encountering a wider world of adulthood mystery.

I Have The Right To Destroy Myself – Young-Ha Kim (2007): A Korean novel from the mid-90s where all the women exist to commit suicide and the guys make art and dream about cars. I don’t know what to make of this book. It’s narrator is a bit Holden Caulfield-esque – if Holden was a serial killer going around Seoul convincing alienated twenty-somethings to kill themselves. And that’s what the novel sort of exudes and revels in: twenty-somethingness that mistakes a shallow morbid lack of empathy for profundity.

Storm Kings – Lee Sandlin (2013): Two-fisted tales of meteorology! This is a fascinating account of the oft-contentious history of American meteorology and storm chasing from the Colonial Era (Ben Franklin and his kite) to the modern day. The chapter titled “The Finger of God” is worth reading, even if it’s just in the bookstore.

Jack Glass – Adam Roberts (2012): Fantomas of the spaceways that sometimes downgrades to fan fiction for equations. I preferred the former more than the latter.

Random Acts of Senseless Violence – Jack Womack (1993): The Diary of Anne Frank meets Clockwork Orange by way of Gossip Girl set in a dystopian USA that looks more familiar than it should. At the end you either feel sad for Lola, its protagonist, or glad that she’s adapted to her changing environment. Worth tracking down.

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3 responses to “August Books”

  1. gordsellar says :

    Yeah, I really enjoyed Junky when I listened to the audiobook not long ago, while feeling thankful never to have met Burroughs.

    The Womack, too, when I read it a year or two ago, was really the best thing I read that year, I think.

    Resume With Monsters is an old book, and one I enjoyed way back when, but I’ve been wondering how it holds up.

    Sadly, I *hated* I Have the Right To Destroy Myself, which was very disappointing since the short fiction I’d read by Kim was really great. The movie is even worse than the book! I’ll get around to his other translated novels sooner or later. (A friend of mine won an award for his translation of Black Flower, and meanwhile I’ve also heard very good things about Your Republic is Calling You.)

    The Kiernan and the Koch sound interesting, thanks for mentioning them!

    • Justin says :

      I liked the opening chapter of “I Have the Right…”, but it got crappy pretty fast. Thanks though for putting the Womack on my radar. Not sure I’ll read all the rest of DryCo, but “Random Acts…” was pretty great. The Kiernan’s more interesting than the Koch IMO, and NYRB is republishing some of the better Simenon novels so I’d recommend reading those (“Three Murders” is great as is “Strangers in the House”) instead. “Resume…” worked, but it also seemed a product of its era.

      • gordsellar says :

        Have you read The Photo Shop Murders? That’s the Kim young-Ha I have read, just one of those little Portable Korean Library jobs but both stories in it are great. (Especially “Whatever Happened to the Guy in the Elevator?”)

        Womack… the other Dryco books are interesting, and Ambient blew me away (at age 26 or something) but Random Acts is kind of in a class of its own. (Though Terraplane is worth a look; time travel Dryco.)

        I’ll add Simenon to my list, thanks.

        Resume… yeah, sounds about right.

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