1 + 1 (+ 1) + Hot Water to Fill

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Here’s my winter drink for when it’s cold outside:

1 shot pomegranate vinegar

1 shot Andong Soju (white bottle)

Mix in a glass, add a teeny spoonful of brown sugar if the idea of drinking vinegar like a pirate scares you, add hot water to fill.

Enjoy!

September and October Books

At some point I should write about the books I stop reading. More often the problem’s not in them, but in my being particular. There are some things that are perfectly fine that I don’t like, and pretending they’re rubbish isn’t really useful.

September

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves – Karen Joy Fowler (2013): Growing up, Rosemary Cooke had a brother and a sister, but now as a twenty-something college student she has neither, and it’s the unraveling of the why and what happened that makes up much of this novel. It’s a great read, and the secret’s not withheld for more than a 100 pages, so it’s not one of those books where you wish someone would just stop for a second and tell you what the big secret is.

Jump-Off Creek – Molly Gloss (1989): I loved this book. It’s a Western about a widow that heads out to the Pacific Northwest and becomes a homesteader. Gloss can really dig in and excavate the present moment her character’s experience. I got weepy when she read the letters from her mom.

Your House Is On Fire, Your Children All Gone – Stefan Kiesbye (2012): Another short novel that reads like comic strips straight from Edward Gorey’s Amphigorey. The difference being that the asshole quotient has been turned way up to eleven. There’s a lesson here. In a book where everyone behaves like an a-hole, the reader will know people will do horrible things at any time because they’re a-holes, and that will rob the story of any and all tension. Overall a decent book, but at the end I couldn’t muster more than a shrug. People are a-holes. Thanks for reminding me.

A Year In Marrakesh – Peter Mayne (1953): Expat Englishman in 1950s Marrakesh that decently articulates the fact that often the worst thing an expat can encounter is another expat. Also less than 200 pages and I felt like I lived more here in these pages than I did in plenty of other books that have longer page counts.

Authority – Jeff VanderMeer (2014): The second book in VanderMeer’s Southern Reach trilogy, in Authority the Ballard meets the Strugatsky brothers of the first book shifts over to a weird spy thriller reminiscent of Stanislaw Lem in His Master’s Voice and Chain of Chance.

October

I Never Promised You A Rose Garden – Joanne Greenburg (1964): Autobiographical novel about a precocious 16 year-old girl with a mental disorder in 1950s USA. Fascinating and heartbreaking. The main character constructs an elaborate fantasy world she uses as a coping mechanism against the real world, only to wind up tormented by her own creation.

The Other Side – Alfred Kubin (1908): A Gothic fantasy novel by expressionist illustrator Alfred Kubin, it influenced both Kafka and Peake, as well as provided a satire of all reactionary, idealistic utopias where one wealthy genius (or “man of ego”), heaves off to some isolated spot with his followers and impresses his will completely upon them to disastrous results. The kind of book you either love or hate. I loved it, but I enjoy a good, long slow train ride to decay and dissolution.

Trickster Travels: The Search for Leo Africanus – Natalie Zemon Davis (2006): Leo Africanus was a 16th Century Moroccan diplomat that was captured by Christian pirates and given to the Pope as a “gift”. In Italy, Africanus converted to Christianity and wrote several books on African geography while serving as a translator of Arabic texts, and then German soldiers sacked Rome and he fled back to North Africa and became a Muslim again. A fascinating book about a man trying to navigate between two hostile ideological movements while respecting them both.

Dinner at Deviant’s Palace – Tim Powers (1985): The myth of Orpheus set in a post-apocalyptic LA where an alien parasite has set itself up as the messiah. Fun and colorful.

The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View From the Future – Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway (2014): A book from the 24th century outlining the collapse of Western Civilization in the 21st century due to an inability to apply the scientific knowledge we have regarding global warming because of our faith in free market capitalism. It’s a short book, and worth the read.

Good Morning, Midnight – Jean Rhys (1938): Modernist novel about a woman returning to Paris after a suicide attempt. She’s a lost soul, drinking too much and spiraling down, and the story’s told in disjointed stream-of-consciousness fashion. There’s a husband that left her, a dead baby, and a series of mistakes and bad decisions hovering around her like a cloud. While the final tragedy is kept off stage, by the novel’s end you know nothing’s going to be right again.

The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms – Amy Stewart (2004): Not just the best book I’ve ever read on the subject of earthworms, but the only book I’ve ever read on the subject of earthworms.

My Favorite Thing About Korea

I realized my favorite thing about living in South Korea. And I don’t even think it’s a South Korean thing, as a hold over to being a country not the size of the USA thing. Like if I lived in Ireland or Italy, I suspect I’d encounter the same thing. It was also what made me like living in Queens, NY. I know, Queens!

Anyway, what I like is that the city where I live, Pohang, retains the quality where a single pedestrian who is probably elderly determines how the city is designed. It’s like if you took Betty White and made her a metric unit that measured urban accessibility. Okay, maybe not Betty White, maybe Jane Jacobs, but you get the idea.

Pohang is a kilojacobs city in that every neighborhood is self-sufficient. Within an easy walk of my house I have access to hardware stores, stationary stores, delis, grocery stores, a traditional market, and restaurants. It was something Joe Mitchell talked about in post-war New York where every neighborhood was a self-contained village. This single pedestrian is accommodated in other ways as well: lots of parks with places to sit down, a robust bus system, and cheap taxis. This is vastly different from the USA where the unit of urban measure is a family with an automobile, and therefore things can be spread out, the supermarket here, the school there, and your entertainment way over there. Public transportation is treated as a charity to be given to the unfortunate, and not as a tie that binds the city together.

Now, I am talking about a small city. I have no idea how Seoul compares, although even there I think it would conform to the model of Queens, NY as opposed to Detroit, MI. And like I said I don’t think this is necessarily a Korean thing, some kind of “Wow. Confucianism dictates that you treat your elders with so much respect!” bull shit, as it is related to country-size. The USA has “Settling This Vast Empty Land” as a foundational myth, and it shows in most of our cities.

Fortunately for me,  Korea’s foundational myths don’t seem to effect urban planning all that much.

It’s Not That

“It’s not that these things happen or even that one survives them, but what makes life strange is that they are forgotten.”

- Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight

That’s one of the books I finished recently. It’s pretty good if you like your modern novels on the short, impressionistic, and ultimately sad and depressing side. In fact if that’s what you like, it’s better than pretty good.

Now if only it had a wizard or some astronauts in it…

Welcome to Lazarus Sector!

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Welcome to Lazarus Sector!

A resource rich galactic borderland, Lazarus Sector serves as the buffer between several interstellar polities and is littered with the ruins of past civilizations. Adventurers, outcasts, and criminals call Lazarus Sector home, hoping to get rich and score big, before their luck runs out.

Here are the big players in Lazarus Sector, although by no means is this every one. Countless organizations and cabals have their agents in the Sector.

The Illuminated: An expansionistic technocratic empire that serves a mysterious God-Emperor known as the Omnissiah, the Illuminated have aggressively pushed into Lazarus Sector and made dubious claims at sovereignty over the region.

The Morn: A once advanced human civilization that destroyed itself in ancient times, the Morn now exist as arrogant scavengers on the fringes of society.

Panoplian: The inhabitants of the Panoply Republic, a vast collection of worlds, cultures, and societies known for its open-minded attitudes and dismally slow political infrastructure.

The Union Worlds: A splinter group of Panoplian corporatists that bristled at the constant meddling of Republican bureaucracy. Their worlds are known for their advanced technologies and gross economic disparity. Pragmatists to the extreme, the Union Worlds are everyone’s ally as long as the credits keep rolling in.

The game starts in Wendigo Station, a Union owned “free” station with lacks governmental oversight that orbits the ruined Morn world of Shard and serves as a crossroads to the Sector.

The group starts with a spacecraft. FTL travel is done via the use of “slipstreams routes”. Known slipstream routes will be on the map. Unknown slipstream routes exist and are a valuable commodity. Who doesn’t want to be the first trader to discover a lost world and fleece the poor souls for all they’re worth before the competition arrives?

The first adventure will be a salvage operation as the crew tries to locate a lost Illuminated ship and reclaim its cargo.

***

It appears I’m running a space game for people here in town. Setting details are partially recycled from a few SWN games I ran last year and every SF RPG I’ve ever read ever.

This time around I’ll try and be less bloodthirsty.

Three Novels To Grow On: A Thought Experiment

A thought experiment – every fantasy novel in the world has been destroyed. You have only been able to save three. From these a new fantasy genre will be born. What three novels are they?

I know two of mine, but I’m still trying to figure out the third.

In the meantime what are yours?

The Dead Enders vs. The Martians

10635852_10152360944371864_1298429769924298763_nTwo weeks back I had a day off and ran a Fate Accelerated game. The picture above gives you some idea who the party were. The set-up was the PCs were senior citizens in a shitty rest home called Sunny Valley, and in the middle of an escape attempt stumbled onto a Martian plot to invade Earth. It was silly. I didn’t completely know how to run the game (I’m pretty sure I tracked Stress wrong), but everyone had fun, and the oldsters saved the day. The party consisted of a retired detective, a military sharpshooter suffering from dementia, a hacker with ties to Canadian Separatists, and a former getaway car driver that operated a souped-up scooter. While prepping for the game I made some NPCs that either died or didn’t get used. Here they are:

Picture is Holger Czukay, bass player for CAN.

Picture is Holger Czukay, bass player for CAN.

Dirk Ostergarten

High Concept: Elderly ex-biker gang member

Trouble: Trouble tends to find me.

Aspect 1: I’ve seen some shit.
Aspect 2: The Man’s always trying to pin shit on me.
Aspect 3: Where did I put my glasses?

Stunts: Dirty Fighter
(Dirk can improvise hand to hand weapons)

Grundy Style
(Dirk knows Pennsyltuckian martial arts and gains a +2 when forcefully attacking.)

One More Stunt to be determined in game.

APPROACHES
Careful: +2
Clever: +1
Flashy: +0
Forceful: +3
Quick: +2
Sneaky: +1

Refresh: 3

Stress:

Consequences:
2 – Mild:
4 – Moderate:
6 – Severe:

Patricia Highsmith is sick of your shit.

Patricia Highsmith is sick of your shit.

Ada Morgan

High Concept: A Mean Old Witch
Trouble: You say I’m cruel like it’s a bad thing.

Aspect 1: Ms. Taffy is my wittle sweetums.
Aspect 2: I’ve turned better men than you into toads.
Aspect 3: It’s never too early for a drink.

Stunts: No one suspects an old lady.
(+2 to sneaky when bluffing and hiding.)

Hexes and curses
(+2 to careful when creating advantages)

Demon familiar
(once per session Ms. Taffy may attack)

Careful: +3
Clever: +2
Flashy: +1
Forceful: +0
Quick: +1
Sneaky: +2

Refresh: 3

Stress:

Consequences:
2 – Mild:
4 – Moderate:
6 – Severe:

#

Now that work and grad school are both back up and running I don’t know when I’ll get the chance to run or play another game. Which is too bad since the summer game I ran here in town was fun, and ended on something of a cliff hanger with one character having a severe curse put on him.

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